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I know by now that you’ve heard the terms Debt-Free Living, Disease-Free Living, or an overabundance of other such coined terms for various marketing ploys to sell products and services. However, I’m not here to sell you anything, as what I’m offering, you already have! You just don’t know it yet!

Context-Free

A context is a circumstance, point of reference, or a situation by which a particular view is aligned and a unique meaning is derived. Our personal contexts are those rules, belief systems, and cognitive maps that we’ve developed over our lives that provide us with a basis for making decisions, passing judgment, applying bias, filtering incoming information, and learning new ideas.

Immediately, it becomes apparent that living a context-free life is impossible. If we even attempted to do so, we would become mental vegetables! Information and sensory information would simply flow in and flop on the floors of our minds.

But, living with an overly complex contextual point of reference can have a similar affect. In such a case, information and sensory information are processed to the point of non-existence and we neither move forward or backward in our lives and learning. Instead, all data is mashed and sliced to fit neatly within the knowledge we already have simply to ensure a safety context.

With complex contexts, regardless of how absurd or inaccurate our context is, the mind will devise any justification even if it uses a basis of other absurd or inaccurate information. It is our way to ensure that our comfort zones go unaffected.

Your Contextual References

We all have some point of reference that we use to analyze and store information that comes in through our physical senses and psi channels. These contexts come from parental voices, authority figures, experiences, trauma, and success. As we move through life, the context is usually altered to accept new information and understand how it is to be processed and managed.

However, many people’s complex contextual references block and isolate the internal mind to the point of stifling and smothering the mental processes. The mind can then only reprocess the same information it has done so in the past. In the end, you derive the same answers to the same problems and end up back at the point you started.

Simplifying Your Context

On the extreme, over time, rules beget rules until, eventually, we have a complex data filtration system that kicks out anything that remote resembles some idea or information not completely in-line with our systems of belief. The human mind tends to develop such complexity to answer questions for which it is unsure. It creates a web of cross-connected information to prove that our lives and beliefs are justified.

This type of thought process leads to a stifling existence, little creativity, and a biased view of life as a whole. In the end, we end up with self-composed theories about how things are and should be and are unwilling to accept anything else. Eventually we can become embittered, angry, frustrated, envious, and prejudiced.

The most effective, yet difficult, way to manage such a situation is to simplify and eliminate those rules and beliefs that have no basis in your life. Why do you hate?why do you feel a certain way about people or situations? That’s a difficult way to approach the solution since we will always develop an answer based on our preconceived notions and complex rules of thought. Such preconceived notions of people and situations are merely ideas to protect our imbalanced mode of thought.

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